Quantcast MEASUREMENT IN THE PIPELINE (cont.) - doert60003

 

Order this information in Print

Order this information on CD-ROM

Download in PDF Format

     

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: MEASUREMENT IN THE PIPELINE (cont.)
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home


   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books
   

 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
MEASUREMENT IN THE PIPELINE
Up
doert6
Next
MEASUREMENT IN THE PIPELINE (cont.) - doert60004
ERDC TN-DOER-T6
September 2004
A Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license is required to supervise the use of the nuclear
density gauge (Herbich et al. 1992).
This production metering system
has a number of different output
indicators, but usually features a
display combining both slurry
velocity and slurry density. The
data from the flow meter (which
measures the total rate of slurry
flow), and the density meter
(which measures the specific
gravity of the pumped mixture)
are  fed  into  the  production
metering system. It indicates the
instantaneous total rate of solids
flow per unit time in a variety of
output parameters per unit time
i.e., cubic meters (or yards) per
hour, tons per hour, etc. It can also include a `totalizer,' which gives a continuous indication of
total production (project total or shift total), eliminating the need for post-operation computations
to determine the total production (Herbich et al. 1992). The capability to calculate instantaneous
and total quantities allows dredge production meter values to be used as an aid in optimizing
dredge operation and production (Pankow 1989). These capabilities allow it to be integrated into
an automated monitoring system i.e., the Silent Inspector (Rosati and Prickett 2001).
ERDC conducted laboratory studies (Pankow 1989) on production meter components. Several
density gauges and flow meters manufactured by different companies were evaluated for
accuracy and reliability in a closed test loop. Different grain-size materials, slurry
concentrations, and velocity regimes were utilized for the study. General conclusions from the
study were:
The most accurate1 flowmeters tested were, in decreasing order, electromagnetic and
Doppler.
Readings among the density gauges and the control density meter were almost identical.
Readings among the magnetic flowmeters and the control flow meter were very similar.
Readings among the Doppler flowmeters and the control flowmeter were significantly
different.
The preferred pipe orientation for both density gauge and flowmeter is vertical, but a
horizontal pipe is acceptable by avoiding high slurry concentrations that produce a stationary
or sliding bed with dune formation. The difference between vertical and horizontal
orientation is on the order of 1 percent for the density gauge, 3 percent for the magnetic
flowmeters, and 5 percent for the Doppler flowmeters.
1
Accuracy is defined here as the agreement between a measurement and an accepted reference value that, when
applied to a set of measurements, involves a combination of random and systematic components.
3

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.